Will You Join Us to #WriteTheNextChapter on Women’s Health?

By Julie Childers |

Like you, we’re just starting to process what the next four years will mean for women’s health and rights.

But one thing is certain: We’re determined to create an environment where all of us — especially those affected by racism, sexism, and economic injustice — feel safe and valued, building on our history of advocating for the well-being of girls and women everywhere.

Thanks to you, we’re ready. You came through for us last year when OBOS was in great need.

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Now we’re eager to #WriteTheNextChapter, and we hope you’ll help us grow and respond to the new challenges our country faces. We want to hear what you think are the most important issues facing girls and women at this moment, and we welcome your photos showing what the next chapter looks like to you. 

Access to evidence-based health information that girls and women can trust, especially in this new political climate, is central to our fight. Our most popular website pages, viewed more than 25,000 times each week, concern abortion options. We will expand these topics to make sure girls and women everywhere have the accurate, up-to-date information they need when they need it.

As part of our reproductive justice work, we’re also looking closely at assisted reproductive technologies within a global context. In December 2016 we’ll launch Surrogacy360, a new website that provides answers to questions about international commercial surrogacy and considers the impact on everyone involved: intended parents, egg providers, surrogates (gestational mothers), and children. We are confident Surrogacy360 will play a crucial role in increasing transparency and public awareness about health and legal issues.

Our advocacy work is vital and will take on a new urgency in coming years. Last year, we were one of the only women’s health organizations to stand against FDA approval of Addyi, a prescription drug developed to treat low sexual desire in women. We raised concerns about the drug’s safety and effectiveness – it definitely wasn’t the “female Viagra” advocates had hoped for. Sure enough, Addyi did poorly, and the FDA issued new guidelines last month for drugs aimed at boosting the female libido. We will continue to counter misinformation in the media and online.

We’re also rolling out a new monthly email newsletter with summaries of posts you might have missed, links to new health articles and news updates, answers to YOUR questions about reproductive and sexual health issues, and cross-generational interviews and stories. You can count on OBOS to help you to stay informed as we navigate this new political terrain. (Don’t miss out, sign up today!)

Now is the time to double-down our commitment to fight for the causes and values that are important to us. We know women’s health and rights are important to you. Can I count on you to help OBOS #WriteTheNextChapter

With your support, we’ll continue to publish and advocate for health information that is free of corporate influence and political bias, increases access to contraception and abortion care, and gives you tools to use and share as part of your own advocacy.  

The past year has been a roller coaster, and I’m grateful for OBOS’s community. Together, we’ll keep moving forward.

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2 Comments

  1. irene says:

    Advocate to change legal system for Sexual assault victims so that more victim come forward and the system is respectful and doesn’t need to put victim on stand but investigate the accused background

    Empower women to say no

    Women are also horny beings!

    What does my vaginal mucous mean?

    Love my body. Screw media messaging around women

    Sexuality and health for the same seed and or other orientation

    What does my ideal relationship look like

    Why am I afraid to vocalize my wants